marinedebris@u.washington.edu

How the oceans can clean themselves: Boyan Slat at TEDxDelft

Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org
29.10.2012 21:43 UTC
http://youtu.be/ROW9F-c0kIQ

Published on 24 Oct 2012 by TEDxTalks
Boyan Slat (@BoyanSlat, Delft, 1994) combines environmentalism,
creativity and technology to tackle global issues of sustainability.
Currently working on oceanic plastic pollution, he believes current
prevention measures will have to be supplemented by active removal of
plastics in order to succeed. With his concept called Marine Litter
Extraction, Boyan Slat proposes a radical clean-up solution, for which
he won the Best Technical Design award 2012 at the TU Delft.

Where millions of tons of plastic kill ocean life and poison food
chains, Boyan sees opportunities to combat this. While researching ocean
plastics during school holidays, he performed analysis on various
fundamental topics (including particle sizes, plastic/plankton
separation and the amount of plastic in the oceans), leading up to the
first realistic concept for cleaning up the world's oceans.

Now a first-year Aerospace Engineering student at the TU Delft, Boyan
has always been passionate about applying technology in an original way
(at age fourteen he set a world record with launching 213 water
rockets), and as an (underwater)photographer and videographer witnesses
environmental degradation through his very own eyes.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local,
self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like
experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to
spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local,
self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently
organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for
the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.*
(*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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Miriam Goldstein
29.10.2012 22:34 UTC
Dear all,

I've tried to stop fact-checking to every cleanup scheme, but I guess it's
an addiction at this point. Also, I feel that as a community we cannot move
forward with practical solutions to marine debris until we lay some of
these common misconceptions to rest. These points respond Boyan Slat's TEDx
talk, but you can also see photos of his proposal here:
http://www.boyanslat.com/plastic5/ and http://www.boyanslat.com/in-depth/.

- Most zooplankton don't survive being caught in a standard manta net,
never mind being spun in a centrifuge. They might still be twitching, but
they have lost a lot of their important parts, like antennae and feeding
apparatus. When we want to capture live zooplankton, we use special
live-collection nets and are very, very careful. For gelatinous zooplankton
like salps, the only way to bring them up in good condition is to
individually capture them in glass jars on SCUBA. I am highly skeptical
that any significant proportion of zooplankton are viable after caught in a
net and spun at 50 RPM. (though I realize that he's not proposing to do
this on a large scale.)
- Mooring fixed "ships" in the open ocean (avg depth 4000 meters) is
highly improbable for a lot of reasons. Just to pick one: I could not find
data on the absolute deepest mooring in the world, but this implies that it
is approximately 2,000 meters.
http://www.offshore-technology.com/projects/atlantisplatform/. So these
ships would have to be moored at twice the depth of one of the deepest
moorings that existed ~2007.
- Having seen no data, I can't really speak to the efficacy of floating
booms in removing microplastic. However, Giora Proskurowski & colleagues
have shown that microplastic get mixed down below the surface in fairly
moderate winds. These booms would be unlikely to function in any
significant wind and wave action. And the mixed layer in the open ocean can
get quite deep, around 100-150 meters in the winter with storms.
- Speaking of wind and wave actions, ships on fixed moorings and
thousands of miles of booms (because the scale of this is also improbable)
have the potential to create a lot more marine debris, and seem
particularly hazardous to entanglement-prone marine life.
- This isn't even getting into issues of scale (the California Current
alone is ~300 miles across), maintenance and fouling...

I realize that Mr. Slat is a student, and have no doubt that he, and the
inventors of countless other plastic cleanup schemes, have only the best of
intentions. I am hoping we can work together as marine debris professionals
to channel their energies into more productive directions.

Regards,
Miriam Goldstein

Miriam Goldstein
Ph.D. Candidate, Integrative Oceanography Division
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD
9500 Gilman Drive, Mailbox 0208
La Jolla, CA 92093-0208
Email: mgoldstein@ucsd.edu
Phone: 858-412-7571
Web: http://www.miriamgoldstein.info

On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 2:42 PM, Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org <
Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org> wrote:

> http://youtu.be/ROW9F-c0kIQ
>
> Published on 24 Oct 2012 by TEDxTalks
> Boyan Slat (@BoyanSlat, Delft, 1994) combines environmentalism, creativity
> and technology to tackle global issues of sustainability. Currently working
> on oceanic plastic pollution, he believes current prevention measures will
> have to be supplemented by active removal of plastics in order to succeed.
> With his concept called Marine Litter Extraction, Boyan Slat proposes a
> radical clean-up solution, for which he won the Best Technical Design award
> 2012 at the TU Delft.
>
> Where millions of tons of plastic kill ocean life and poison food chains,
> Boyan sees opportunities to combat this. While researching ocean plastics
> during school holidays, he performed analysis on various fundamental topics
> (including particle sizes, plastic/plankton separation and the amount of
> plastic in the oceans), leading up to the first realistic concept for
> cleaning up the world's oceans.
>
> Now a first-year Aerospace Engineering student at the TU Delft, Boyan has
> always been passionate about applying technology in an original way (at age
> fourteen he set a world record with launching 213 water rockets), and as an
> (underwater)photographer and videographer witnesses environmental
> degradation through his very own eyes.
>
> In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local,
> self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like
> experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to
> spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local,
> self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized
> TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx
> program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to
> certain rules and regulations)
> ______________________________**_________________
> MarineDebris.Info mailing list
> To post to this list, email MarineDebris@u.washington.edu from the
> account you are subscribed with. You may change your email settings at:
> https://mailman1.u.washington.**edu/mailman/listinfo/**marinedebris<https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/marinedebris>
> Questions? Email Nick Wehner at nwehner@marineaffairs.org.
>
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Zack Bradford
29.10.2012 22:53 UTC
I agree. My primary concern with this "pie-in-the-sky" thinking is that it distracts from the simple, everyday solutions that are out there for stopping plastic before it even gets to the ocean (i.e., changing our designs, our behaviors, and our consumer and convenience thinking) as well as provides an excuse for continuing to treat the ocean as a trash receptacle. These materials won't last in the ocean forever-that is to say that plastic will eventually be removed from the system via sedimentation and other processes-but we need to stop overloading the ocean with more trash than it can handle. Our resources should not go into cleaning up what's already there unless or until we can stop more of it from reaching the ocean.

Zack

Zack Bradford
Ocean Policy Research Analyst
P 831-647-6847

[cid:image001.gif@01CDB5ED.0DF02150]

Monterey Bay Aquarium
886 Cannery Row, Monterey, CA 93940
www.montereybayaquarium.org<http://www.montereybayaquarium.org>
Our mission is to inspire conservation of the oceans.

From: marinedebris-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:marinedebris-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Miriam Goldstein
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2012 3:31 PM
To: MarineDebris@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [MarineDebris] How the oceans can clean themselves: Boyan Slat at TEDxDelft

Dear all,

I've tried to stop fact-checking to every cleanup scheme, but I guess it's an addiction at this point. Also, I feel that as a community we cannot move forward with practical solutions to marine debris until we lay some of these common misconceptions to rest. These points respond Boyan Slat's TEDx talk, but you can also see photos of his proposal here: http://www.boyanslat.com/plastic5/ and http://www.boyanslat.com/in-depth/.

* Most zooplankton don't survive being caught in a standard manta net, never mind being spun in a centrifuge. They might still be twitching, but they have lost a lot of their important parts, like antennae and feeding apparatus. When we want to capture live zooplankton, we use special live-collection nets and are very, very careful. For gelatinous zooplankton like salps, the only way to bring them up in good condition is to individually capture them in glass jars on SCUBA. I am highly skeptical that any significant proportion of zooplankton are viable after caught in a net and spun at 50 RPM. (though I realize that he's not proposing to do this on a large scale.)
* Mooring fixed "ships" in the open ocean (avg depth 4000 meters) is highly improbable for a lot of reasons. Just to pick one: I could not find data on the absolute deepest mooring in the world, but this implies that it is approximately 2,000 meters. http://www.offshore-technology.com/projects/atlantisplatform/. So these ships would have to be moored at twice the depth of one of the deepest moorings that existed ~2007.
* Having seen no data, I can't really speak to the efficacy of floating booms in removing microplastic. However, Giora Proskurowski & colleagues have shown that microplastic get mixed down below the surface in fairly moderate winds. These booms would be unlikely to function in any significant wind and wave action. And the mixed layer in the open ocean can get quite deep, around 100-150 meters in the winter with storms.
* Speaking of wind and wave actions, ships on fixed moorings and thousands of miles of booms (because the scale of this is also improbable) have the potential to create a lot more marine debris, and seem particularly hazardous to entanglement-prone marine life.
* This isn't even getting into issues of scale (the California Current alone is ~300 miles across), maintenance and fouling...
I realize that Mr. Slat is a student, and have no doubt that he, and the inventors of countless other plastic cleanup schemes, have only the best of intentions. I am hoping we can work together as marine debris professionals to channel their energies into more productive directions.

Regards,
Miriam Goldstein

Miriam Goldstein
Ph.D. Candidate, Integrative Oceanography Division
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD
9500 Gilman Drive, Mailbox 0208
La Jolla, CA 92093-0208
Email: mgoldstein@ucsd.edu<mailto:mgoldstein@ucsd.edu>
Phone: 858-412-7571
Web: http://www.miriamgoldstein.info

On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 2:42 PM, Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org<mailto:Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org> <Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org<mailto:Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org>> wrote:
http://youtu.be/ROW9F-c0kIQ

Published on 24 Oct 2012 by TEDxTalks
Boyan Slat (@BoyanSlat, Delft, 1994) combines environmentalism, creativity and technology to tackle global issues of sustainability. Currently working on oceanic plastic pollution, he believes current prevention measures will have to be supplemented by active removal of plastics in order to succeed. With his concept called Marine Litter Extraction, Boyan Slat proposes a radical clean-up solution, for which he won the Best Technical Design award 2012 at the TU Delft.

Where millions of tons of plastic kill ocean life and poison food chains, Boyan sees opportunities to combat this. While researching ocean plastics during school holidays, he performed analysis on various fundamental topics (including particle sizes, plastic/plankton separation and the amount of plastic in the oceans), leading up to the first realistic concept for cleaning up the world's oceans.

Now a first-year Aerospace Engineering student at the TU Delft, Boyan has always been passionate about applying technology in an original way (at age fourteen he set a world record with launching 213 water rockets), and as an (underwater)photographer and videographer witnesses environmental degradation through his very own eyes.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
_______________________________________________
MarineDebris.Info mailing list
To post to this list, email MarineDebris@u.washington.edu<mailto:MarineDebris@u.washington.edu> from the account you are subscribed with. You may change your email settings at: https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/marinedebris
Questions? Email Nick Wehner at nwehner@marineaffairs.org<mailto:nwehner@marineaffairs.org>.

_______________________________________________
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Harold Johnson
29.10.2012 23:00 UTC
Thank you Miriam for the excellent points.

The answer is to stop force-feeding the ocean our plastics. Unfortunately, as we're seeing right this very second in greater NYC, when we build our cities up to the water's edge and fill them with plastic -everything-, that plastic will get into the ocean. Misguided talk about technology to sweep the ocean clean distracts from the real answer. And it also lets the plastic industry kick the can down the road for years by pretending to be making a difference "investing" in research and experiments it knows will never come to fruition. Enough.

- Harry

Harold Johnson
The Flotsam Diaries
Saco, Maine
http://www.theflotsamdiaries.org
http://www.facebook.com/FlotsamDiaries

From: Miriam Goldstein
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2012 6:31 PM
To: MarineDebris@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [MarineDebris] How the oceans can clean themselves: Boyan Slat atTEDxDelft

Dear all,

I've tried to stop fact-checking to every cleanup scheme, but I guess it's an addiction at this point. Also, I feel that as a community we cannot move forward with practical solutions to marine debris until we lay some of these common misconceptions to rest. These points respond Boyan Slat's TEDx talk, but you can also see photos of his proposal here: http://www.boyanslat.com/plastic5/ and http://www.boyanslat.com/in-depth/.
a.. Most zooplankton don't survive being caught in a standard manta net, never mind being spun in a centrifuge. They might still be twitching, but they have lost a lot of their important parts, like antennae and feeding apparatus. When we want to capture live zooplankton, we use special live-collection nets and are very, very careful. For gelatinous zooplankton like salps, the only way to bring them up in good condition is to individually capture them in glass jars on SCUBA. I am highly skeptical that any significant proportion of zooplankton are viable after caught in a net and spun at 50 RPM. (though I realize that he's not proposing to do this on a large scale.)
b.. Mooring fixed "ships" in the open ocean (avg depth 4000 meters) is highly improbable for a lot of reasons. Just to pick one: I could not find data on the absolute deepest mooring in the world, but this implies that it is approximately 2,000 meters. http://www.offshore-technology.com/projects/atlantisplatform/. So these ships would have to be moored at twice the depth of one of the deepest moorings that existed ~2007.
c.. Having seen no data, I can't really speak to the efficacy of floating booms in removing microplastic. However, Giora Proskurowski & colleagues have shown that microplastic get mixed down below the surface in fairly moderate winds. These booms would be unlikely to function in any significant wind and wave action. And the mixed layer in the open ocean can get quite deep, around 100-150 meters in the winter with storms.
d.. Speaking of wind and wave actions, ships on fixed moorings and thousands of miles of booms (because the scale of this is also improbable) have the potential to create a lot more marine debris, and seem particularly hazardous to entanglement-prone marine life.
e.. This isn't even getting into issues of scale (the California Current alone is ~300 miles across), maintenance and fouling...
I realize that Mr. Slat is a student, and have no doubt that he, and the inventors of countless other plastic cleanup schemes, have only the best of intentions. I am hoping we can work together as marine debris professionals to channel their energies into more productive directions.

Regards,
Miriam Goldstein

Miriam Goldstein
Ph.D. Candidate, Integrative Oceanography Division
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD
9500 Gilman Drive, Mailbox 0208
La Jolla, CA 92093-0208
Email: mgoldstein@ucsd.edu
Phone: 858-412-7571
Web: http://www.miriamgoldstein.info

On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 2:42 PM, Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org <Fabiano.Barretto@globalgarbage.org> wrote:

http://youtu.be/ROW9F-c0kIQ

Published on 24 Oct 2012 by TEDxTalks
Boyan Slat (@BoyanSlat, Delft, 1994) combines environmentalism, creativity and technology to tackle global issues of sustainability. Currently working on oceanic plastic pollution, he believes current prevention measures will have to be supplemented by active removal of plastics in order to succeed. With his concept called Marine Litter Extraction, Boyan Slat proposes a radical clean-up solution, for which he won the Best Technical Design award 2012 at the TU Delft.

Where millions of tons of plastic kill ocean life and poison food chains, Boyan sees opportunities to combat this. While researching ocean plastics during school holidays, he performed analysis on various fundamental topics (including particle sizes, plastic/plankton separation and the amount of plastic in the oceans), leading up to the first realistic concept for cleaning up the world's oceans.

Now a first-year Aerospace Engineering student at the TU Delft, Boyan has always been passionate about applying technology in an original way (at age fourteen he set a world record with launching 213 water rockets), and as an (underwater)photographer and videographer witnesses environmental degradation through his very own eyes.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
_______________________________________________
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To post to this list, email MarineDebris@u.washington.edu from the account you are subscribed with. You may change your email settings at: https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/marinedebris
Questions? Email Nick Wehner at nwehner@marineaffairs.org.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Questions? Email Nick Wehner at nwehner@marineaffairs.org._______________________________________________
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To post to this list, email MarineDebris@u.washington.edu from the account you are subscribed with.
You may change your email settings at: https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/marinedebris
Questions? Email Nick Wehner at nwehner@marineaffairs.org.